A Day With Daddy

About the book

Title

A Day With Daddy

Author

Nikki Grimes

Publisher

Scholastic

Ages 4 – 7

A boy enjoys every moment of a special day with his father, as they play in the park, share french fries, and see a movie together. Includes activity ideas for parents and children.

Tadgell’s exuberant watercolors show the family bonds, the longing, and the love. Hazel Rochman | Booklist Online

A sweet and gentle look at a difficult topic with watercolor illustrations that match the mood… Catherine Callegari | San Antonio Public Library

ISBN: 978-0439568500 PUBLISHED: 2004 FORMAT: Picture book

Reviews

Booklist

Upbeat without being preachy or sentimental, these titles in the new Just for You! easy-reading series tell realistic stories of African American family life with excitement and grace. In Jumping the Broom, Erin’s big sister is getting married. Everyone is happy except Erin, who can’t find the right gift—until Grandmother tells her about jumping the broom, a wedding tradition that started among slaves. The characters are beautifully defined in both words and pictures, and many kids will recognize Erin’s pride in honoring her roots. In A Day with Daddy, a boy living with his mom talks about having fun with Dad on their weekly outing. Grimes draws on personal memories of growing up in a divorced family, and her simple, poetic words describe what goes on until the boy returns home with “enough happy / to last me one week.” The separation is here as well as the joy, and Tadgell’s exuberant watercolors show the family bonds, the longing, and the love. Both books include excellent notes for adults and suggestions of things they can do with their children.
Hazel Rochman Booklist Online

School Library Journal

These four easy readers, all of which feature African-American characters, are a bit uneven in quality. All begin with tips for adults on reading aloud and end with questions and activities that encourage youngsters to relate to the stories’ themes. [A Day With] Daddy, in which a boy tells about his weekly visit with his father, is a sweet and gentle look at a difficult topic with watercolor illustrations that match the mood, while What Do You Know?, which relates a young girl’s early-morning romp through fresh snow, is wordy with uninspired text and illustrations. Girls and Bath! are both fun stories with hit-and-miss rhyming styles and illustrations that bring the texts to life.
Catherine Callegari San Antonio Public Library, TX Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information